Teens don’t call them “intimate images”, it’s “nudes”: Meta’s Parental Guide on Teen Sexting

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Every teen of today’s generation is aware of the word “sexting”. Some may also have “sexted” as, believe it or not, it has become quite popular now. As a parent, we understand that you would be worried about it and even wonder about ways to talk to them about it or maybe just STOP them from doing it.

Apart from the fact that sharing intimate images is illegal in some countries, Meta’s Teen Sexting Guide for Parents rightly pointed out that parents generally end up taking two approaches while talking about this topic with their teens: Asking them NOT to do it and showing them the worst-case scenario. These generally don’t work.

Meta’s Teen Sexting Guide for Parents rightly pointed out that parents generally end up taking two approaches while talking about this topic with their teens: Asking them NOT to do it and showing them the worst-case scenario. These generally don’t work.

Meta has therefore come up with a guide for parents that points out some approaches that they can take in talking to their teens about sexting. It also contains some statistics that will put parents’ minds at ease. This is Meta’s effort in making parents aware that it’s okay to talk about sexting before their teen finds them in trouble. This parental guide will not only help parents in making this a less awkward conversation but also help teens understand what is at leverage when they share or receive nudes.

As a teen, “everyone’s doing it” is enough to push you into doing anything. And this is what the guide explains to both parents and teens: everyone is NOT doing it. As common as sending nudes sounds, statistics suggest that the actual number of teens engaging in sexting is much less than you imagine.

“The most important thing to tell our teens is that it’s not true that “everybody’s doing it.” You should also tell them never to let anyone pressure them into sending an intimate image.”

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The Guide says, “Teens are very sensitive to what they think their friends and peers are doing: if they believe something is common, they’re more likely to think it’s okay to do it themselves. The most important thing to tell our teens is that it’s not true that “everybody’s doing it.” You should also tell them never to let anyone pressure them into sending an intimate image.” Some research suggests that as few as one in ten teens engage in sexting.

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The guide also deals with ways parents can talk to their teens about how they should react to receiving nonconsensual images and what to do with the images that they had asked for.

Meta pointed out one simple rule that is like the rule that everyone is aware of but being humans, we tend to not follow it which is known as the “disengagement mechanism” and Meta pointed out how to tackle them too.

It all comes down to one simple rule: if you’re not absolutely sure the person (or people) in the photo wanted it to be shared, don’t share it.

– Meta’s Parental Guide on Teen Sexting

The guide covers everything that a parent should do. While we know that it may be a difficult conversation but with sex-ed being inefficient and our teens learning about this stuff from all the wrong places, it becomes your duty as a parent to engage in this conversation and make your kids aware.

As parents, you should remember that you don’t have total control over stopping your kids from sexting but you can definitely help them make better choices. Meta seems to be with you on this.

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